My Philosophy of Teaching

A Call to Action

Exercising the courage to become more purpose-centered, other-focused, internally directed, and externally open results in increased hope and unleashes a variety of other positive emotions (Quinn, 2004). I as a teacher am not so solely because of anything tangible. Nor am I a teacher solely for those inspired moments in each student’s day. Rather, I feel that teaching is both a privilege and a responsibility. It is a privilege as I do have the opportunity to touch lives, bring new hope to possibly otherwise under-informed futures, and hopefully and occasionally inspire someone to be great. Yet, I additionally feel teaching is a responsibility each generation has to its successors. As society can be regarded as a construct of social networks, a collection of living systems, and its role to be that of sustainability long-term; teachers hold the responsibility of ushering in an informed era for those that follow such that they have the opportunity to continue the successes of the past and create their own in the process.

Learning as SKILLS

Self-Knowledge Inventory of Lifelong Learning Strategies (SKILLS) is based upon five aspects of learning which are essential to the learning process, these are the constructs of metacognition, metamotivation, memory, resource management, and critical thinking (Conti & Fellenz, 1991). Taking this construct as developed by the Center for Adult Learning Research at Montana State University into account, it creates a paradigm with which to gauge not only the structure and success of a given lesson plan, yet the success of each student in terms of their own personal level of learning as well. As metacognition regards the ability of the learner to reflect upon what has been learned and work to make their own learning process more efficient over time, it is my responsibility to ensure each learner has the tools to do so. As metamotivation regards the learner’s control over their own motivational strategies, it is both my responsibility and privilege to ensure those options exist while in a learning environment. As both memory and resource management are stand-alone concepts, I operate with an obligation to ensure the methodologies I employ allow for greater capture and memory usage while allowing for greater resource utilization and management as well. Finally, as critical thinking is a concept not uncommon in the academic environment, I will put defining this term to the side and instead comment that critical thinking is what I feel the majority of my teaching strategy is reliant upon. As critical thinking is what I feel separates the successful from those otherwise not experiencing similar success, I feel critical thinking and success are mutually beneficial and directly correlated. Yet, to ensure the greatest level of critical thinking in those I guide, I return to Quinn’s words regarding being purpose-centered, externally focused, and use these emphases to ensure each learner operates at their highest critical thinking potential.

Sculpting Futures

The workplace, the professions, the leaders and foot soldiers of civic society must all do their part – and that obligation cannot be spurned or postponed or fobbed off on institutions that are incapable of picking up the responsibility (Gardner, 2006). Institutions of higher learning have existed far before any referenced work concerning concepts such as adult learning strategies. Yet, very little separates the adult from the adult learner and again from those instructing such as myself. As that responsibility exists to ensure the sustainable future of our society, I feel taking an analytical approach to learning as with the SKILLS construct, aids in ensuring both that privilege and responsibility are well served. Finally, as a litmus test for whether I have succeeded as a teacher, I look to Wind & Crook’s definition of advancement. Science sometimes advances not through evolutionary progress in a given framework but through sudden leaps to a new model for viewing the world (Wind & Crook, 2005).

– Justin

Conti, G.J. & Fellenz, R.A. (1991). Assessing adult learning strategies. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University.

Gardner, H. (2006). Five minds for the future. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Quinn, R.E. (2004). Building the bridge as you walk on it: A guide for leading change. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Wind, Y.J. & Crook, C. (2005). The power of impossible thinking: Transform the business of your life and the life of your business. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Wharton School Publishing.

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