Amid the Tumult, the Purposive Manager

Management as a practice can be seen as a combination of art, craft, and science, which take place on an information plane, a people plane, and an action plane (Mintzberg, 2009). A good manager, then, is someone who moves beyond the traditional confines of seeing one’s function as planning/organizing/leading/controlling each in isolation at a specific point in time, and instead sees managing as using all aspects of one’s intuition, training, and talents at once and in perpetuity.

Where managers are now described in the literature as operating in an environment wherein interruptions can be encountered up to every 48 seconds of the day, and the manager’s attention is thus piecemeal and scattered across multiple tasks as well as decisions in a single hour, it remains important that a “good manager” use this as a strength not as what defines their work. Rather than using the bustle of today’s business environment as an excuse for surface-level consideration of every decision encountered, it is instead an opportunity to convey consistency in message and purpose with every new decision. A day can be filled with hundreds of isolated decisions made at-a-glance, or they can all be made while guided by a single thread of focused purpose and attention to the direction he/she wishes to push their ecosystem within the manager’s given sphere of influence. If the manager wishes to develop a team guided by thoughtful analysis, each decision made can be an interruption prior to returning to this task, or it can be a way to substantiate this wish by emphasizing thoughtful analysis in each decision. A good manager thus uses technical skills to facilitate the professional and technical aspects of daily work, while also using those same technical skills to describe how best to support and influence the technical aspects of others’ work as well. Soft skills are equally important to ensure not only that influence is purported, yet the purpose and direction as the manger sees fitting is communicated within his/her network in a way which delivers a lasting impression.

An Operations Manager uses his technical knowledge of the business to drive operations, while also using this technical knowledge to guide others’ work within the scope of process variation, selection, and retention. His soft skills are important as the potential global, and very likely diverse workforce with which he works must be influenced and led, not directed and controlled alone. The Finance Manager must use her technical skills to drive the fiduciary sustainability of an organization and her team, but must also use her technical skills to seek an efficacious value chain to sustain the organization’s competitive advantage. Her soft skills thus are what provide the conduit for this process, and technical skills the information necessary for her network to later develop the tacit knowledge necessary for this to occur. A “good manager”, then, is aware of the organization’s ecosystem, his/her influence on this ecosystem, and will put to use all intuition, training, and talents present, to help others see how an organization’s value chain drives its purpose.

– Justin

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One thought on “Amid the Tumult, the Purposive Manager

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