Post-Doc Blogpost: Reciprocal Recognition – Permitting Evaluation to Evoke Advocacy

I had the recent privilege of attending a presentation by Dr. Raymond Cheng, who spoke of the topic of degree equivalency across the world. This presentation covered such qualifiers as degree programs either being quick, cheap, or recognized, yet not any combination of more than two of these. The purpose of this emphasis is for learners and potential graduates to conduct an informed review of how equivalency is regarded when particularly looking at a given degree and its sister recognitions in other parts of the world. Where this becomes meaningful for program evaluation, is when we look beyond the confines of either the evaluation of process outcomes or program outcomes, and look at the issue of how program evaluation is designed to either prevent, or permit, evaluator as advocate for the learners served by these programs.

To describe our ultimate intent Dane (2011) remarks, “Evaluation involves the use of behavioral research methods to assess the conceptualization, design, implementation, and utility of intervention programs. In order to be effectively evaluated, a program should have specific procedures and goals, although formative evaluation can be used to develop them. Summative evaluations deal with program outcomes” (p. 314). At this level Dane permits our understanding that while many interests can converge upon a program’s process and programmatic outcomes, it will be its goals which drive what of the program is evaluated, and to what end. Do we wish to evaluate whether equivalency is a primary goal of a given degree program? Are we instead concerned with the political factors affecting the equivalency evaluation process? These and other considerations are seen as potential intervening variables amid the process of evaluating a program’s efficacy. Yet it may just be that student advocacy is the goal, not an outgrowth of the goal. We return to Dane (2011) to summarize, “Because the researcher is probably the most fully informed about the results, the researcher may be called upon to make policy recommendations. Personal interests may lead a researcher to adopt an advocate role. Although policy recommendations and advocacy are not unethical themselves, care must be taken to separate them from the results” (p. 314).

Evaluations should employ technically adequate designs and analyses that are appropriate for the evaluation purposes (Yarbrough et al., 2011, p. 201). While many of us understand this point anecdotally, combining this concept with advocacy allows us to then understand that it may not be simply a program’s learning outcomes which are the greatest goal. What of the international student who wishes to complete an MBA in the US, have that degree recognized as an MBA in Hong Kong, such that he/she may make a global impact as either consultant or scholar? If the extant evaluation process does not take this goal into account, mere learning outcomes centered on financial analysis, strategic planning, or marketing management as an MBA program would include could potentially be for not when considering the long-term prospects of this student in specific. We, then, as program evaluation personnel are given a critical task when in the design phase, as well as the formative evaluation phase, determining whether the stated goals of a program are in alignment with the goals of those who stand to benefit from that program.

Several factors can influence the role of an evaluator, including the purpose of the evaluation, stakeholders’ information needs, the evaluator’s epistemological preferences, and the evaluation approach used (Fleischer & Christie, 2009, p. 160). This conclusion in mind we see the inherent design equation is only complicated by the involvement of the evaluator him/herself. How this person regards the creation of new knowledge is among the considerations given among the inherent design process. Yet where concepts such as reciprocal recognition, evaluator epistemology, negotiated purposes, and defensible evaluation design converge, is upon the goals established not just by the program’s administrators alone, but the stated goals inclusive of those established by those who stand to benefit most from a program’s existence. Thank you for this reminder, and apt coverage of this topic Dr. Cheng.

Dane, F. C. (2011). Evaluating research: Methodology for people who need to read research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

Fleischer, D. N., & Christie, C. A. (2009). Evaluation use: Results from a survey of U.S. American Evaluation Association members. American Journal of Evaluation, 30(2), 158–175.

Yarbrough, D. B., Shulha, L. M., Hopson, R. K., & Caruthers, F. A. (2011). The program evaluation standards (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s